Gibson Kirk Hammett Greeny

zw470

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Krik has the KH3. I'm sure he has some other Eclipses. There is no way he didn't cop one of those Nosferatu models that just came out.

Related to my earlier post I saw a video a while ago with one of their techs saying that between James and Kirk they easily have 500 guitars at the HQ. James also has at least one 59 that he's played live.

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I could have sworn he posted a pic of a red or purple sparkle ESP USA Eclipse, too, but I can't find it now.
 

eaeolian

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Peter Green era Fleetwood Mac is back in the mid/late 60s and very early 70s, before they sold out, back when they played blues and blues influenced rock, sometimes bordering on early metal.

For example, you may be familiar with Judas Priest’s “The Green Manalishi (with the 2 Pronged Crown)”, but that was written by Peter Green for, and originally released by, Fleetwood Mac; Priest just covered it. Likewise, he wrote and released “Black Magic Woman” with Fleetwood Mac, though you’re probably more familiar with Carlos Santana’s cover of the song. So even if you don’t know his playing directly, you know of him through players he influenced.

When Fleetwood Mac started to sell out, Green was going through some substance abuse issues, so he ended up quitting the band, quit playing guitar, and sold his Les Paul (now named Greeny) to Gary Moore. And Gary Moore is also an absolute motherfucker of a guitar player In his own right.

Both players have a wider range than these videos represent, but I’ll post a few to give you an idea of their styles:
You know, maybe it's some kind of arrogance of old age, but it's incomprehensible to me that *guitarists* wouldn't know both of these guys. If you don't, you should, especially Gary, if for nothing else than this song:

 

neptoess

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That's disgusting. Juniors and Specials are great guitars in their own right and used probably a lot more than bursts on famous recordings. People like this are dickheads. Taking vintage guitars that normal human beings may be able to afford and cutting them up to make counterfeit bursts for rich dentists.

It's like those assholes 20 years ago buying up every vintage mustang to chop it up and turn it into another fucking Eleanor copy...
There were a lot more Juniors and Specials. If the guitar is thrashed, it’s not worth their time to restore it. They go into their logic here

These guys are normal down to Earth guys. They’re far from rich dentists, even if that’s now their customer base (well, I’m not a dentist, I guess)
 

eaeolian

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...why just ESP? Why not both ESP and Gibson since he can do both? :lol:
Also from everything I've read, Gibson's CS is on another level compared to the standard production stuff we love to bitch and moan about.
@noodles has a 7 string LP that was made in the CS, and it's a damn good guitar. Night and day from a production Standard.
 

eaeolian

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There were a lot more Juniors and Specials. If the guitar is thrashed, it’s not worth their time to restore it. They go into their logic here

These guys are normal down to Earth guys. They’re far from rich dentists, even if that’s now their customer base.
I mean, I can get more behind this idea that a "new" copy of an old guitar. It's kinda like an extreme refin, although damn expensive. :lol:
 

neptoess

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@noodles has a 7 string LP that was made in the CS, and it's a damn good guitar. Night and day from a production Standard.
While I’m sure stuff like this is amazing, it’s the historic stuff that Gibson Custom does that’s so excellent for me. The 67 V reissue was a featherweight, but really resonant. I couldn’t stop playing it, before I even plugged it in. The neck carve was a comfy full C with a 1-9/16” (though most people used to modern guitars would probably call it an unplayable baseball bat with too narrow string spacing). The 45100 frets are a nice balance between easy bends and feeling the board under your fingers. The Maestro bar had zero play in it, and responded beautifully. And once I plugged it in… man those A3 custombuckers sound great. Maybe we do lose some character by wax potting pickups…

The differences between an R9 and a Gibson USA LP standard are likely the same. I’ve played an R9, and I own a really great Gibson USA V, but I honestly don’t think I’ve ever played a Gibson USA LP. The R9 was amazing, but I’m not really a burst guy, so it was like “this is an amazing playing piece of furniture”. I’ve definitely played Gibson USA Vs that were nothing to write home about though. I think I’d have to be careful about playing a B7, because I’d probably be taking it home. A one piece all mahogany LP body (no separate carved top, just one massive chunk) has to feel at least a little special
 

eaeolian

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While I’m sure stuff like this is amazing, it’s the historic stuff that Gibson Custom does that’s so excellent for me. The 67 V reissue was a featherweight, but really resonant. I couldn’t stop playing it, before I even plugged it in. The neck carve was a comfy full C with a 1-9/16” (though most people used to modern guitars would probably call it an unplayable baseball bat with too narrow string spacing). The 45100 frets are a nice balance between easy bends and feeling the board under your fingers. The Maestro bar had zero play in it, and responded beautifully. And once I plugged it in… man those A3 custombuckers sound great. Maybe we do lose some character by wax potting pickups…

The differences between an R9 and a Gibson USA LP standard are likely the same. I’ve played an R9, and I own a really great Gibson USA V, but I honestly don’t think I’ve ever played a Gibson USA LP. The R9 was amazing, but I’m not really a burst guy, so it was like “this is an amazing playing piece of furniture”. I’ve definitely played Gibson USA Vs that were nothing to write home about though. I think I’d have to be careful about playing a B7, because I’d probably be taking it home. A one piece all mahogany LP body (no separate carved top, just one massive chunk) has to feel at least a little special
Honestly, for what those cost I'd just buy a Collings, but then again I'm not really a Gibson guy, as the 11 superstrats sitting behind me attest to. :lol:
 

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Honestly, for what those cost I'd just buy a Collings, but then again I'm not really a Gibson guy, as the 11 superstrats sitting behind me attest to. :lol:
I’m a V guy. I have an RG, and an Eric Johnson strat, but neither get as much love as my Gibson V. I much prefer the EJ to the RG too. I think the original strat is a downright excellent guitar design. The superstrat adds to it, but also takes away a bit (the bridge single coil, the expressiveness of the six screw bar vs a Floyd, etc). My most recent buy was a Jackson though. So there’s certainly room in the world for both.

As for Collings, I don’t get it. Same deal as Nash for me. They might be nice, but I can’t see spending that much for an LP or ES and not getting the open book headstock or even the right scale length (Collings are 24-7/8”, Gibsons are more like 24-5/8”). Gibson isn’t perfect, but, if I want a Gibson design, I’m either buying a real Gibson, or getting a local luthier to build one that Gibson Custom won’t
 

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I think it's cool. Love Gibson. Love Kirk. He's one of the most famous guitarists ever and probably inspired a lot of us to pick up the guitar in the first place. Yeah, of course a replica made in the custom shop, in limited numbers, with high novelty value, is going to be expensive.

$50K isn't too bad if you're the sort of person to buy that sort of guitar.
 

soul_lip_mike

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Kirk should just probably have ESP make him a USA custom Eclipse...would probably be a much better 'les paul' than whatever Gibson can make.

Shouldn't be a problem. ESP can never say no to Metallica.
One of Kirk's new ESP sparkle V's he plays was built in the USA shop.
 

eaeolian

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I’m a V guy. I have an RG, and an Eric Johnson strat, but neither get as much love as my Gibson V. I much prefer the EJ to the RG too. I think the original strat is a downright excellent guitar design. The superstrat adds to it, but also takes away a bit (the bridge single coil, the expressiveness of the six screw bar vs a Floyd, etc). My most recent buy was a Jackson though. So there’s certainly room in the world for both.

As for Collings, I don’t get it. Same deal as Nash for me. They might be nice, but I can’t see spending that much for an LP or ES and not getting the open book headstock or even the right scale length (Collings are 24-7/8”, Gibsons are more like 24-5/8”). Gibson isn’t perfect, but, if I want a Gibson design, I’m either buying a real Gibson, or getting a local luthier to build one that Gibson Custom won’t
I've played several Collings. I get it. It used to be that if I wanted a "Les Paul" type, I'd just buy a Heritage, but prices on those have gone through the roof.
 

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I've played several Collings. I get it. It used to be that if I wanted a "Les Paul" type, I'd just buy a Heritage, but prices on those have gone through the roof.
Heritage did used to be a hell of a bargain. Now, like you said, they're as much or more than Gibson USA, which kind of defeats the purpose. I guess I'm just lucky I'm not an LP guy.
 

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I am really not the target audience for these things, but there is this doubly satisfying thing about Kirk owning Greenie that I just love:
1 - it gets played as opposed to being secured in some safe for bragging rights;
2 - purists have fits all the time about Green / Moore's guitar being played by Kirk and those are exceedingly entertaining
 

neptoess

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I am really not the target audience for these things, but there is this doubly satisfying thing about Kirk owning Greenie that I just love:
1 - it gets played as opposed to being secured in some safe for bragging rights;
2 - purists have fits all the time about Green / Moore's guitar being played by Kirk and those are exceedingly entertaining
It also makes you think about how much music technology has evolved in 60 years. When Greenie was made, with its unpotted pickups, high gain amps didn't exist. If Kirk would have tried to a play a 59 on stage in the late 80s, it would have been hellish to try and fight all the microphonic squealing. And it would certainly require at least a slightly different signal chain to actually get the same sound he was getting from his EMG guitars.

Today? Silent stage, Axe FX. No squealing. No more headache than changing the patch on the Axe FX to switch from an EMG guitar to Greenie.
 

eaeolian

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It also makes you think about how much music technology has evolved in 60 years. When Greenie was made, with its unpotted pickups, high gain amps didn't exist. If Kirk would have tried to a play a 59 on stage in the late 80s, it would have been hellish to try and fight all the microphonic squealing. And it would certainly require at least a slightly different signal chain to actually get the same sound he was getting from his EMG guitars.

Today? Silent stage, Axe FX. No squealing. No more headache than changing the patch on the Axe FX to switch from an EMG guitar to Greenie.
It can't be that microphonic, since Moore used to play it onstage when he was in Thin Lizzy, and while that wasn't "high gain" by modern standards, they were freakin' LOUD. Your point still stands, though.
 

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It also makes you think about how much music technology has evolved in 60 years. When Greenie was made, with its unpotted pickups, high gain amps didn't exist. If Kirk would have tried to a play a 59 on stage in the late 80s, it would have been hellish to try and fight all the microphonic squealing. And it would certainly require at least a slightly different signal chain to actually get the same sound he was getting from his EMG guitars.

Today? Silent stage, Axe FX. No squealing. No more headache than changing the patch on the Axe FX to switch from an EMG guitar to Greenie.
Oh, honestly I don't need a third party to acknowledge the absurd advances in tech when it comes to the sheer practicality of gigging. From absurdly more stable guitars with construction techniques and materials unavailable back in the day when I started out and did my first tours to basically not having to rely on huge rigs and the logistic issues they come with to being able to do fly-ins with no need for rental rigs (and we all know how much those typically respect the rider you sent) it's just amazing.
 

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You know, maybe it's some kind of arrogance of old age, but it's incomprehensible to me that *guitarists* wouldn't know both of these guys. If you don't, you should, especially Gary, if for nothing else than this song:


These guys are considered masters for a reason, and everyone should study the masters. Even if they end up not being your thing, your playing will benefit a lot from studying them.
 


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