Any creative ideas what can I do with a floyd type tremolo?

Discussion in 'Music Theory, Lessons & Techniques' started by Brett89, May 8, 2007.

  1. Brett89

    Brett89 SS.org Regular

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    I never owned one, I'm a bit afraid from it, I much more prefer fixed bridges becouse I think they are stronger, and have more sustain, keep in tune etc. But sometimes I think It would be a good tool , but I don't have any idea, only the Slayer type agressive up-down pull, but I don't like that. I have a strat trem that can only do dives, and I can't realy do any usefull thing with that.

    S any idea what can a guitarist do with he's trem in a riff or in a solo?

    Or tremolos aren't for me...
     
  2. Mastodon

    Mastodon Songs about My Cats

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  3. darren

    darren Decibel Guitars Forum MVP

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    The most creative thing you can do is block the trem and not use it. ;)

    :lol:

    But on a serious note, (no pun intended) i sometimes use the trem for "sliding" from one note to another. The flutter/warble effect is nice when you want to add a really obnoxious noise into the middle of a solo.
     
  4. Makelele

    Makelele SS.org Regular

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  5. BigM555

    BigM555 I SS.org Salute You! Contributor

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    For me the master of all things whammy has got to be Joe Satriani.

    His "lizard down the throat" technique is an extreme example of what Darren describes above.

    For it's use in creative phrasing Yngwie is pretty tastefull. Vai of course has excellent examples.

    I believe Michael Lee Firkins uses the whammy in his slide-but-not-slide techniques.

    No need to be afraid. As it goes for sustain. Yes a good solid body string through will give you more sustain but few few people make really good use of sustain anyway. In my own experience far too many people have the noise gates set far too high in order to compensate for obscene amounts of gain and poor gain structures throughout their signal chain.

    But that's just my opinion. :D
     
  6. shredlord

    shredlord Well-Known Member

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  7. Jongpil Yun

    Jongpil Yun Contributor

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    Any time you would use glissando or very wide vibrato, think about using the vibrato bar.
     
  8. distressed_romeo

    distressed_romeo F'king ............ Forum MVP

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    Check out some videos of Shawn Lane and early Allan Holdsworth to see how expressive some subtle bar manipulation can be.
     
  9. All_¥our_Bass

    All_¥our_Bass Deathly Chuuni

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    Gilmour is another subtle (and sometimes not, in the case of "Sorrow") whammy bar user.
     
  10. distressed_romeo

    distressed_romeo F'king ............ Forum MVP

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    You could also check out absolutely anything featuring Brad Gillis...
     
  11. BigM555

    BigM555 I SS.org Salute You! Contributor

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    /\ ugh, Brad Gillis......the self proclaimed whammy bar king.

    Makes me shudder. Just never was much of a fan of his.

    He took FAR too much attention from Jeff Watson who was the superior player in my opinion.
     
  12. Drew

    Drew Forum MVP

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    For the best subtle use of the bar I've ever heard, start listening to George Lynch. I saw him in a clinic once - he was palming the bar (about the midpoint - try it, it makes subtle inflections WAY easier) almost the entire time he was playing.

    The man's a master. :yesway: Satriani and Vai are great guys to turn to if you want some "pronounced" whammy bar moments, but a lot of the best stuff is when it's tough to tell that it IS a whammy bar. Once you get heavily into ghost notes with the bar, you can actually capture a lot of the slinky feel of a slide solo without sounding anything at all like slide.
     
  13. playstopause

    playstopause Contributor

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    Amen to that.
    First names that came to mind were these three.

    Brett, just grab one of Vai records and you'll be in for 432341 ways to use a whammy.
    It's just part of his whole technique.
     
  14. MetalMike

    MetalMike IKILLUWITHMYBALDHEAD Contributor

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    You could also use the tremolo to "dip melodies" or give the impression of a very wide vibrato that is almost classical violin sounding. A great example of this would be Opus Pocus by Jason Becker or the end of Rusty Cooley's solo in Outworld's Riders.
     
  15. Jongpil Yun

    Jongpil Yun Contributor

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    YouTube - American Idol - Top 6 - Idol Gives Back - Kelly Clarkson HD

    Jeff Beck on American Idol. Pretty good.
     
  16. distressed_romeo

    distressed_romeo F'king ............ Forum MVP

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    Actually, check out the song 'Where Were You?' by Jeff Beck...in addition to being one of the most beautiful pieces of music ever written for the guitar, it's a masterclass in how to play melodies using the bar.

    I once played it for a school music exam, and replicating Beck's lyricism and flawless intonation was one of the hardest things I've ever attempted.
     
  17. DDDorian

    DDDorian Mantis Toboggan, M.D Super Moderator

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    As far as rythym stuff goes, your hero Trey Azagthoth uses the whammy in his rythym playing quite a bit, more notably in the slower, sludgier stuff like "God Of Emptiness". Wes Borland uses it quite a bit these days in a rythmic fashion, and Mattias Eklundh never lets the fucking thing go:lol: Jeff Beck still owns that shit though, as far as I'm concerned.
     
  18. distressed_romeo

    distressed_romeo F'king ............ Forum MVP

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    Adrian Belew uses some interesting whammy effects as well...
     
  19. distressed_romeo

    distressed_romeo F'king ............ Forum MVP

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    David Torn is great for bar stuff as well, but he uses a trans-trem, so a lot of his stuff might be hard to replicate with a normal guitar.
     
  20. eleven59

    eleven59 None shall pass. Contributor

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    I'm a big fan of Wes Borland's use of flutters in his rhythm playing lately. That, crossed with his tapping/slapping style sounds really cool.

    YouTube - wes borland
     

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