435 Htz tunning>

Gabial

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is there a noticable difference in the dynamics and harmonics with a 435 tunning? seems Dime and EVH used them for some of thier guitar work.
 

Emperoff

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Gabial

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Why stop at 435Hz when 432Hz and all of its unlocking of the mystical secrets of the universe is 3 lousy Hz away?
Thats exactly what I thought!, I'm like I undertand watts not hrtz. anyway, I just finnished with my srewing around with the tunning, did not notice much. I believe the magic pill is still in our fingers, not so much the signature tricks.
 

c7spheres

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- What's interesting is some greats among greats from every genre supposedly used it. Hendrix, DIme, Prince, EVH. I use it and like it. If they actually used it then I trust them. It just feels better, imo.
- If anything, 440hz is a conspiracy to make you break strings easier and your voice fatigue faster. lol
 

ShredmasterD

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- What's interesting is some greats among greats from every genre supposedly used it. Hendrix, DIme, Prince, EVH. I use it and like it. If they actually used it then I trust them. It just feels better, imo.
is there a noticable difference in the dynamics and harmonics with a 435 tunning? seems Dime and EVH used them for some of thier guitar work.

- If anything, 440hz is a conspiracy to make you break strings easier and your voice fatigue faster. lol

is there a noticable difference in the dynamics and harmonics with a 435 tunning? seems Dime and EVH used them for some of thier guitar work.
sometimes i wonder if they just slowed the tape speed when mastering or tracking back in the day. when tuning to an older record , sometimes it doesn't line up with a particular frequency on a tuner. its not 440, or 438 or 435...its just in between on some
 

Spaced Out Ace

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- What's interesting is some greats among greats from every genre supposedly used it. Hendrix, DIme, Prince, EVH. I use it and like it. If they actually used it then I trust them. It just feels better, imo.
- If anything, 440hz is a conspiracy to make you break strings easier and your voice fatigue faster. lol
EVH did not use it. It was a little more elaborate than that.
 

Spaced Out Ace

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sometimes i wonder if they just slowed the tape speed when mastering or tracking back in the day. when tuning to an older record , sometimes it doesn't line up with a particular frequency on a tuner. its not 440, or 438 or 435...its just in between on some
There is a belief that the tapes for albums, say the first two Megadeth records, were basically subjected to whatever, resulting in the tuning of those albums being somewhere between E and Eb.

I think it is more likely that KISS, Megadeth, VH, et al just grabbed a guitar that was relatively intune with itself (even if it wasn't 440), and everyone tuned to that by ear. For instance, VH is supposedly Eb for the DLR era, but VH (1978) is slightly sharp on several of the tracks. In addition, I think by the second or third album, Eddie had acquired a Peterson tuner (which was massive), and had a weird tuning. It wasn't as simple as "just slightly detune the B string" like a lot of YouTubers say.
 

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is there a noticable difference in the dynamics and harmonics with a 435 tunning? seems Dime and EVH used them for some of thier guitar work.
No. There is no possible physics that makes a different reference pitch better for every instrument, or even every kind of instrument.

Like, the question doesn't really hold water if you think about it for a second. The difference you will notice in the harmonics is that they will be 20 cents flat.

EVH and Dime and anyone else (quacks excluded) tuned flat for the same reason Chuck tuned to D standard. Because it sounded different to everyone else. Lower keys just sound slightly darker by the nature of being lower. People who tune to, say, 432Hz and say it sounds better are being tricked by the fact that it sounds close enough to the 440Hz that it still sounds like E, but has a little bit of extra darkness that Eb has.
 

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sometimes i wonder if they just slowed the tape speed when mastering or tracking back in the day. when tuning to an older record , sometimes it doesn't line up with a particular frequency on a tuner. its not 440, or 438 or 435...its just in between on some
I've always wondered whether that's what Metallica did on For Whom the Bell Tolls. It's latter than E standard 440Hz tuning, but sharper than Eb standard.
 

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No. There is no possible physics that makes a different reference pitch better for every instrument, or even every kind of instrument.

Like, the question doesn't really hold water if you think about it for a second. The difference you will notice in the harmonics is that they will be 20 cents flat.

EVH and Dime and anyone else (quacks excluded) tuned flat for the same reason Chuck tuned to D standard. Because it sounded different to everyone else. Lower keys just sound slightly darker by the nature of being lower. People who tune to, say, 432Hz and say it sounds better are being tricked by the fact that it sounds close enough to the 440Hz that it still sounds like E, but has a little bit of extra darkness that Eb has.
Eb (or thereabouts) was pretty common in the 70s, so I don't know about that. EVH used sweetened tunings so the guitar would sound in tune for various (mostly major) chords. In fact, if anything, his approximate tuning was par for the course during the era he used them, but the sweetened tuning idea was done so he'd be in tune, as equal temperament is pretty flawed.
 

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I've always wondered whether that's what Metallica did on For Whom the Bell Tolls. It's latter than E standard 440Hz tuning, but sharper than Eb standard.
From what I understand, there is a belief (perhaps because an engineer or producer mentioned it) that Metallica did some shenanigans to speed up songs for studio albums. Apparently, it was done to make them tighter and more precise at the speed they wanted the songs. That said, For Whom the Bell Tolls isn't really a fast track (compared to say Battery or Blackened), and I'm curious how much the cold played a factor since they did those albums in Denmark or whatever.
 

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Why not 415.3 Hz?
Or 392.0 Hz?
Or, hell, 220 Hz?

Metal musicians ought to tune up to 666 Hz. Maybe I'll tune down to 333 Hz, since I'm only a little bit evil.

In the USA, tune to 60 Hz, since that's the frequency at which electrical equipment buzzes, then you can start a doom metal band with an old pole-top transformer and a couple of fluorescent light bulbs.

Or 11.574 µHz, to be more in tune with the Earth, with some of the band playing in 31.689 nHz.

Does your brain Hertz yet?

Which is the best reference pitch? The answer is very very simple - it's whichever one is the most widely accepted. Look, it's nothing more than a ruler. Maybe you want to define a "new inch" as 2.5 cm instead of the old inch of 2.54 cm. No real harm in that, I guess. Now instead of being 5'11.5", you can say you're 6'1". No harm in that, either. You want a new neck for your guitar, let's measure it's scale length, 26.91 new inches. Well, drat, replacement necks only come in 25.5 inches... wait, are those old inches or new inches? Meh, just get a new guitar, no real harm done, right?

Do you see how that just makes things unnecessarily complicated? And what novelty does it add to the music? If you want to tune down 20 cents, go for it. Obviously collaborating is going to be annoying, since you'll have to explain the tuning, and then the other musicians all have to figure out how to tune down 20 cents, but, if, for whatever reason, it sounds better to you, it could be worth it. Now, personally, I think it's a waste of effort, but I'm not going to tell you what you can and cannot do. I can recommend trying something else instead - I happen to really like 19EDO tuning. Notes are still easy to remember - ABCDEFG, just with separate sharps and flats instead of sharing enharmonic equivalent notes. The end result is that both major and minor thirds sound noticeably better, 4ths and 5ths sound largely the same, and 2nds and 7ths sound a little less good, but it also gives you a wider tonal palette. If you're going to go through the effort of reinventing the tuning wheel, you might as well take it to a level where something interesting actually happens. But don't let me discourage you from setting out on your own journey.
 

StevenC

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Eb (or thereabouts) was pretty common in the 70s, so I don't know about that. EVH used sweetened tunings so the guitar would sound in tune for various (mostly major) chords. In fact, if anything, his approximate tuning was par for the course during the era he used them, but the sweetened tuning idea was done so he'd be in tune, as equal temperament is pretty flawed.
Yeah, lots of people were using sweetened tunings, but they tended to be based on A=440Hz not A=415Hz (which is what we would call G#, leading to a guitar tuned to what we would call Eb standard).

Again, anyone who was tuning as low as Eb (or D etc) wasn't doing it to stand out. Hendrix was probably the first famous person to tune to Eb but there are loads of alternate tunings older than the electric guitar which existed for various reasons. I'm pretty sure Megadeth and Pantera were tuning a quarter tone flat on purpose, again to stand out because quartertones are incredibly uncommon.

EDIT: @Adieu snap
 


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