Unpopular opinions

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by icos211, Feb 10, 2015.

  1. HeavyMetal4Ever

    HeavyMetal4Ever SS.org Regular

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    Unpopular opinions huh? Ok..."everyone who disagrees with me is wrong"...oh, wait, that's an opinion rising in popularity daily, worldwide... :(
     
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  2. TedEH

    TedEH Cromulent

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    Is it an unpopular belief that even the worst people are probably working with what they think are the best intentions? I know some people disagree with that one.
     
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  3. vilk

    vilk Very Regular

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    I think most people recognize that the very worst people are almost always working with only self interest. If they were theoretically capable of having "the best intentions", it would only be relative to their own self.

    You could argue that Hitler or Pol Pot were working towards a "utopia"... but it's not like they did a survey. It was their own, personal "utopia" that they were working towards.
     
  4. KnightBrolaire

    KnightBrolaire gearwhoricus americanus

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    yeah that could lead to a whole moral relativism discussion. People generally don't like hearing that their personal dogmas don't apply to others.
     
  5. TedEH

    TedEH Cromulent

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    Yeh, that was more or less what I meant. I would also say that "the best people" are similarly working off of self interest on some level.
     
  6. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    The USA is extremely diverse in it's political culture. Vermont, for example, is probably more like Canada than it is like the rest of the USA. But we still have this sort of division, especially in the Northeastern corner of the state, where there are a lot of old folks and old fashioned folks here who want nothing more than for all of the hippies to leave and take what little diversity came with them.

    There was a show on public radio talking about the "AM band" of Americans. Like, most places you go, there is some homogeneous distribution of what the show was calling AM and FM Americans. The AM being the conservative evangelical type and the FM being the mainstream type. In Vermont, you'll probably have a difficult time tracking down the AM band here, but once you find it, you'll see how deeply rooted it is. -Not that there's anything wrong with having a deeply rooted set of opinions, but I was surprised, after living here for a short time, and seeing how friendly and hospitable most people were, when I found the AM band, and heard how they really felt about me and my college education and my citified notions.

    I think so.

    I think that, in general, people do everything that they do for self-motivated reasons, otherwise, they wouldn't do those things at all, but that there are various levels of self-motivation.

    The most highly respected motivations really seem to simply be taking the long way to do something. The most disrepected way is the quickest way, in gross general speaking. You could argue that Hitler wanted to make the world a better place by having everyone be some sort of Ken doll, free of hereditary disease, strong, and intelligent. The basis for his notion was totally wrong, though, and furthermore, the means by which he wished to affect that future was through genocide, murder, war, etc. If he would have simply encourages Aryan-descended people to have more sex with each other, then maybe he would have been more of a venerated public figure and less of the embodiment of evil for the rest of history.

    There are also measures taken to benefit a person through direct methods, or through indirect methods, and the indirect methods, which may also benefit other people, will, of course, be more highly regarded than the direct method of benefiting only one's self (and one's direct progeny as well). I think that's where a lot of wealthy business owners and corporations come into play. A corporation, being a non-human entity governed by a group of humans in order to enact the maximum amount of financial benefit for the corporation itself, is seen as a wicked thing. A government operating much the same way with similar methods, but benefiting the population of the nation, can be viewed, at least domestically, as a benevolent organization.

    So you get to the philosophical discussion about heroics and villainy, and it's a very nuanced and deep topic into which one can delve and leave with no concrete answers that can be applied to morality.

    Here's a topic for thought: Pol Pot. The guy took over the Cambodian government and enacted government action to force millions of people into labour camps, simply because of their social status or ethnicity, in order to make sure there were ample resources for the poor people in Cambodia. It's sort of a Robin Hood story, except the rich were deliberately and simultaneously starved and worked to death in mass numbers, in order to create an abundance of resources for the poor and ultimately partake in exactly none of those resources. The man behind this was not a dictator and wanted his name and face kept secret, unlike pretty much every other dictator. He later claimed that what was done was decided by the people, not by him, and that he only wanted what was best for them, and wanted no glory nor wealth for himself. What kind of person can function as the primary motivating force in genocide/class-icide and mass murder by torture and starvation, yet not be a cult-of-personality? That case, for me, is just bizarre. Did Pol Pot truly believe he was acting ethically?!
     
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  7. HeavyMetal4Ever

    HeavyMetal4Ever SS.org Regular

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    Is it an unpopular opinion to say that I like individuals, but dislike people in general?
     
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  8. HeavyMetal4Ever

    HeavyMetal4Ever SS.org Regular

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    I honestly don't know what the popular belief is on that one. I can say, in my experience, the biggest assholes I've met seem to lack that level of introspection. It's like they don't bother questioning their own intentions, they just let their inner asshole hang out unfiltered 24/7. YMMV.
     
  9. Seybsnilksz

    Seybsnilksz SS.org Regular

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    Cars are clumsy vehicles.
     
  10. TedEH

    TedEH Cromulent

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    Compared to what? Are not all vehicles a bit clumsy on some level?
     
  11. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    Jetpacks! :)
     
  12. Flappydoodle

    Flappydoodle SS.org Regular

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    Maybe it's been said already, but I think the music industry is 95% full of shit. Placebo effect, bias and snobbery are everywhere. People think they can hear all sorts of things, when they can't, and they use silly words to try and describe/justify it.

    Also, vintage is not better. In fact, most vintage stuff was/is shit. Things almost always get better with time, money and effort spent on them, not worse. Gibson didn't make the best guitar ever in 1959 and then spend the next 60 years making it progressively worse. That's stupid. There's no "magic" of a 1959 Les Paul other than the novelty of having something old. Same for the block letter 5150, the Dual Recto, or any other "classic" version of something which has a modern equivalent. Those companies make newer, better, cheaper alternatives with more features, and idiots still insist on paying a fortune for out-dated original versions. It's hilarious.
     
  13. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    I agree, but I don't think either of those are unpopular opinions around these parts.

    Actually, I would go a little further and say that the popular music industry is 99% full of shit. The talented singers are there, but they all lip synch anyway, regardless of whether they can sing or not. Milli Vanilli was the butt of every joke in 1990, but serves as the template for music in 2018, except instead of replacing the singer with another singer who can actually sing, autotune. The overarching point is the same.
     
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  14. TedEH

    TedEH Cromulent

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    I think it depends on what you're looking for and how you're making the comparison. Something being old doesn't make it sh*t by default, it's just old. It might be good, it might not. Part of the whole "vintage stuff is better" mindset I think comes from how we internalize what's available to us. The bike I commute to work with is vintage, because a brand new bike of a comparable build (while objectively better) would be prohibitively expensive. The speakers I just got for at-home listening are vintage - again, because comparable quality brand new speakers would cost an arm and a leg. My main guitar amp (a Mark IV) was made in the early 90s I think... and this is a case where I think they haven't matched the quality in terms of sound, but they've easily beat it in features since.

    So, sort of yes, sort of no, mostly context is important.

    There are some fields/products where, realistically, there's only so much you can improve. Like I tend to enjoy the sound of old amps, but that's mostly a matter of taste in "what does a good amp sound like" changing. The primary function of an amp (take guitar, add dirt, make louder) has been basically the same process the whole time, it's only the package, extra features, manufacturing process/quality that has evolved since (if you don't count digital, etc).
     
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  15. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    My unpopular opinion is that this word is abused a hell of a lot in the guitar industry. That 1959 Les Paul is vintage, but that 1965 Teisco E-100 is not.

    But yeah, most old gear was shit, but it ain't "vintage" if it was shit. I'm sure some guitars being made right now will someday be vintage, but it may well mean something different to people in 2077 than it means to us now.

    ------

    Modern amps, IMO, are better than old amps, though. There are modern-built amps with "vintage" design, which is one thing, but amps that are much more efficient and lightweight, that more consistently create tones that are more easily shaped - that's objectively better than that old Vox AC-30 in the corner that sometimes hums for inexplicable reasons, doesn't work at all when the humidity is above 85% RH, and is nearly impossible to consistently dial in - plus, at best, it just makes a "vintage AC-30 tone."
     
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  16. MaxOfMetal

    MaxOfMetal Likes trem wankery. Super Moderator

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    It's kind of hard to understand vintage gear unless you've been fortunate enough to be around it as much as I have. On top of being lucky enough to be trusted with dozens upon dozen of vintage pieces for setup and repair, my old man was really into old Fenders.

    There is something to them. There's a reason that people kept them for decades before there was such things as pre-worn customs and a market willing to pay the price of a super car for.

    Wood and even metal smooths down and gets out of the way. Wood settles and becomes as solid as granite.

    I'm not just talking about old Fenders and Gibsons, but anything that's seen some decades.

    You're not wrong, there is definitely a lot of bullshit out there. The industry definitely wants to prop this stuff up for a hefty profit.

    I just think the guitars themselves are very misunderstood.
     
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  17. KnightBrolaire

    KnightBrolaire gearwhoricus americanus

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    the only vintage stuff I like is old acoustic guitars. I have a 1970s ibanez classical guitar and it sounds nice and warm/rich. My dad gave it to me and he said it used to sound a lot brighter when he was younger. It's a nice contrast to my bright and snappy cordoba.
     
  18. TedEH

    TedEH Cromulent

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    I suppose "vintage" is a case where most of the time, people probably use using a more colloquial definition of "old".
     
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  19. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    I think I know what you are saying there, but one I never understood was Danelectro. As a little kid, I wanted a guitar like the one Jimmy Page used for alternate tuning, and when I first tried an old Danelectro, I was shocked at how horrible it was- clunky tone, rattly body, nothing seemed to fit flush with anything else, action a mile high and still fret buzz... Years later, working as a tech, sometimes people would bring in their old Silvertone or Stella or KMart special guitars for a set up. Of course, everything back then on cheap guitars was glued into place without adjustment, so, what can you do? Steam off the neck, and glue it back on straight?! Ugh.
    Another one that I sometimes struggled with was Rickenbacker. Obviously way better than the Sears or KMart special, but unbelievably unadjustable for how much monetary value those things held.
    Old acoustics almost never seemed to have anything adjustable on them. I spent a lot of time working on old Martins with no adjustments on the truss rod. Surprising how such a prized and iconic and nearly priceless guitar would have an unadjustable truss rod and still have a lot of issues with backbow.
    Funny how all of your time around old instruments made you cherish them and all of my time around old instruments made me shy away from them.
    If it's worth the trouble, though, I certainly can't fault anyone for their preference.
    Different strokes for sure.
     
  20. TedEH

    TedEH Cromulent

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    The most tempted I've ever been to buy into a custom made instrument was when I met a guy who made some super unique acoustics that had a lot of modern and adjustable features on them. The neck was bolted on in a way that you could move it around to compensate for any wood movement, the bridge was a custom made contraption that let you do pretty much as much setup as you would on an electric, etc. I wish more acoustics were like this.
     

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