Strandberg Boden os 7: Pros and Cons?

Discussion in 'Sevenstring Guitars' started by Dredg, Aug 27, 2017.

  1. eugeneelgr

    eugeneelgr SS.org Regular

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    Try out the bolt on neck joint if you can before you purchase. It's the only thing I wish could be better on mine(less obtrusive) that is applicable to the boden os spec.
     
  2. C_Henderson

    C_Henderson SS.org Regular

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    Agree. It's quite good and all frets are easily accessible for me, but it could be a bit better. Probably the one thing that I think could be improved on the Boden design.
    Coming from years of playing mostly Strats and Teles though, it definitely is an improvement and a welcome change (as much as I love them).
     
  3. NikolajBak

    NikolajBak SS.org Regular

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    I respect your opinion, but I think you misunderstand me partly. I’m sorry, I’m not a native speaker, but when I say features I refer to something different than common guitars, something that makes it stand out. I’m not talking about if it’s easy to make or not, I’m referring to the upcharge and if it’s worth it to the person who created this thread. If you are convinced that the bodens doesn’t offer anything special, or don’t think of the fanned frets, lightweight body, endurneck, headless design, “glow in the dark” side dots etc. as features, because they are easy to make, that’s ok with me, but I don’t see it that way. That was the reason I bought the guitar. These things stand out compared to my other guitars.

    If they are so easy to make, why isn’t everybody doing it? If it would give them an edge over the competition? I’m not a builder, I don’t know how difficult these things are to create. Your points concerning the computer created stuff all makes perfect sense, but then again, if all guitars are easy to make, why do we pay even more money for guitars from other brands, if they are all created the same way? I don’t know, I’m just wondering.

    I'm not throwing around cheap excuses, there is nothing to excuse. When I said ‘design’, I didn’t mean that the guitars are expensive to design. I meant that you pay a lot for a unique design, like when you buy a Mayones with v-frets, an Audi instead of a Skoda or an expensive lamp with a special design or whatever. That doesn’t mean it’s fairly priced, no, it’s overpriced I agreed compared to other guitars of the same build quality. But if the ‘features’ that the Strandbergs offer are important to the person who created this thread, perhaps he would be very happy with this guitar.
    If not, then I would not by a Boden OS.
     
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  4. A-Branger

    A-Branger SS.org Regular

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    yeah I got what you say now. You are jsut paying for the brand and their take on a guitar. The uniquenes of what they offer. You want a Standberg, you pay for a Standberg, same as if you want an LP, then you pay for a Gibson, ect ect.

    My point was to say that what they offer, although yes, unique, its not difficult to make/build. Yes, it was hard to come up with the idea, but its not hard to build. In other words, you are paying for the name brand, not for some magically "unique" method of building a guitar. You also are paying for some features like side glow dots (which lots of other companies now do btw) and the semi multiscale, and all the other features like I already mention that can bring up the price of the build up on the factory, but you also are paying $$$$ for a name brand too.

    I only said that because I have seen too many times people justifying the price with the "design" part of the equation, like if they were charging back their investment in R&D like a car, with the "you are paying for the enduroneck!....", this is something great about them, but in no way they should up charge that much for a neck shape, as it does not take much longer to make like any other neck out there.
    You are paying for the brand itself, or maybe even for the low volume numbers they manage, or their expensive shipping process they have to deal with ect ect. How much that upcharge is worth it, is up to you. Im not saying is wrong or good, just making aware of it
     
  5. Bryancap7

    Bryancap7 SS.org Regular

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    I've considered getting a boden a few times, only just getting into the headless guitar game. the neck profile seems a bit...gimmicky
     
  6. Razerjack

    Razerjack SS.org Regular

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    From my experience...
    Pros:
    Very light and very short
    Quite comfortable to play
    Looks kinda cool(if you're into the shape that is)
    Very 'snappy' and loud when played unplugged

    Cons:
    QC is pretty much nonexistent(bad frets, cracked neck, horrible top if that counts). So always carefully inspect the guitar before you buy.
    Quality issues aside, the craftmanship of the guitar is still quite average.

    The rest, including the Endurneck, the fanned frets etc doesn't make much of a difference really, I wouldn't say they're 'gimmicky' but only that I don't feel or think about them when I play the guitar.
     
  7. Lemonbaby

    Lemonbaby SS.org Regular

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    The build of a Boden is absolutely more expensive, no doubt about it. Add the low volumes plus custom headless hardware and there's your price tag.
     
  8. A-Branger

    A-Branger SS.org Regular

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    it might be more expensive due to reasons I already mention and you too, like the hardware, grade of woods used, stain/paint, QC level chosen at factory, quality of electronics, pickups, top vs veneer, low volumes of guitars made, ect, stuff like that plus whatever the brand wants to make a profit. But no by the guitar itself. To make this guitar it requires the same process as an Ibanez RG would do (or any other guitar build at WMI), if not this guitar is actually easier as it requires no 3D carve, its a flat top with a rounded edge, just like any other superstrat flat top really. Same as the neck, the cnc instead to cut a D shape or U or C, it just cut a square one. Plus this neck requires no scarf glue process or extra material to be cut as it has no headstock, so in a way it uses less wood (or trows away less wood once its cut).

    Thats my point, everyone seems to think because this is a "Standberg" with an "enduroneck" that the build process of the guitar is some magical mystical long process that requires extra $$$ to be done. Nope, this is a normal guitar like any other, build like any other out there, its jsut the shape is different, as any other guitar out there. The price comes from other factors
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2017
  9. C_Henderson

    C_Henderson SS.org Regular

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    Somewhat long informative note incoming:

    Yeah, of course we're paying a plus for their uniqueness and low volume production. How much exactly we can't know, but adding up the costs of what we know and compared to other guitars produced in the same factories, I don't think it's that much to be honest.

    They might not be that much more difficult to make, but they surely take a lot longer to make when compared to traditional guitars, and therefore they are more expensive for the manufacturer and for us buyers (and trust me, as someone who works with factories and suppliers I know how much little changes in their production line can add up to the final cost). And that's just the manufacturing part. Considering that just bridge and pickups alone can already cost ~$1k, the final price tag doesn't look inflated to me at all.

    To give a numeric example, where I live a Schecter KM-7 (great guitar made at WMI, I think most will agree) costs between 1400 and 1600 € depending on where you get it. The Strandberg Prog 7 (also made at WMI) is made at much lower volumes, with somewhat nicer woods (or maybe not, but roasted maple for example is surely a bit more expensive), more expensive hardware (bridge alone costs roughly 400 € more than the Hipshot) and more expensive pickups (again about 150-200 € more per set). If the Strandberg was made at the same volumes as the Schecter, with the same range of profits (whichever it is), we'd be talking about ~2100 € on average for a Prog 7. And that's simplifying costs A LOT. They actually cost 2500 €, so in my opinion, I can't objectively say they're much more expensive that any other guitar of similar quality, which barring some unfortunate exceptions (much less common this year), it's top notch.

    So, in the end, both NikolajBak and A-Branger are on the right train of thought. Strandbergs aren't expensive just because: their design and playability are unique but you're not just paying for that, the biggest difference comes from all the other factors that should be taken into account when building a guitar. Because of course no one goes from building thousands of super strats with Hipshots and Duncans to a dozen "ergonomic headless" with custom hardware and boutique pickups at zero cost.
     
  10. diagrammatiks

    diagrammatiks SS.org Regular

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    i don't think anyone except the building process to cost a bajillion more. it probably costs a couple hundred per unit. but the hardware is custom made and not made by wmi.

    the ormsby goliath is about 800 less then the os6/metal and it uses all korean made hardware, veneers, and has a standard neck profile.

    the legator ghost is retailing for 800. It's made in china. pretty much a piece of shit and has oem pickups, nickel frets, and chinese hardware.

    The only other production headless you can somewhat buy is the corona ape which is 1300 usd. I don't know where the hardware and stuff is made although I'm pretty sure the guitar is made in korea. You don't get fan frets or any fancy stuff except emgs.

    A kiesel vader with a 3 piece neck, chambered body, flamed maple top, luminlays, and ss is 2100. you get hipshot hardware but also lithiums.

    assuming that you even want a headless guitar in the first place..which if you don't then who cares it's all going to seem ridiculously overpriced.

    your choices right now for a production guitar are either a chinese groteberg for like 300 which is going to be terrible. A chinese legator for 800 which is also going to be super bad.

    1300 gets you into the first decent guitar in that price range...

    The only 2 choices you have after that is if you want to pay 800 more for strandberg hardware, fluences, and the enduranck
    or 800 more for american production and hipshot.

    I don't really understand how this seems unreasonable to anyone.

    The only reasonable objection could be that you really want american production and you hate the eduraneck in which case get the vader. that's the beauty of having choices.
     
  11. Lemonbaby

    Lemonbaby SS.org Regular

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    The wood/carbon neck is glued w/ epoxy instead of wood glue and needs different tools - the carbon prepregs can't be cut like wood. Furthermore, the multiscale fretboard can't be sawn in three seconds like a regular one. As you're referring to an RG: Ibanez and Jackson have 15%-20% upcharges from their regular 7s to the multiscale versions.
     
  12. takotakumi

    takotakumi SS.org Regular

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    Pro: No Headstock :)
    Con: No Headstock :(
     
  13. cubix

    cubix Spring of 86

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    Someone who is comparing Stranberg manufacturing cost to regular guitars has no idea about manufacturing :) One bridge part on a Strandberg costs more to make than a whole bridge on some guitars (as they are injection moulded pot metal parts on most instruments). Sorry but this is miles away from anything you'll see on mass produced instruments.
     
  14. KnightBrolaire

    KnightBrolaire 8 string hoarder

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    injection molded lmao. There's so many guitars in the 2k price range using milled brass/steel bridges (hipshot or abm or schaller). Nobody injection molds bridges, the cheaper ones are usually milled steel with steel saddles.
     
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  15. Lemonbaby

    Lemonbaby SS.org Regular

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    AFAIK, almost all trem components and many TOMs are injection molded. Not necessarily a bad thing - I love the Ibanez TightEnd bridge for example. If you compare that to some paper thin Tele bridges I'd prefer the molded parts any time.
     
  16. cubix

    cubix Spring of 86

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    They are molded, deal with it :) Maybe the Gibson titanium saddles aren't, but the base ect - molded. If they were actually machined you wouldn't think they'd make it out of stainless rather than some shit that is good for melting and pouring? ;) A machined Titanium FloydRose BASEPLATE costs USD330, and that is not because it's titanium but because of the manufacturing cost.
     
  17. A-Branger

    A-Branger SS.org Regular

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    I didnt knew they were using carbon fiber sheets between the wood laminations. I eat my words then, I wasnt aware of it :)

    as the speed to do multiscale frets, you would be amazed and how quick those guy work. Makes pretty much no difference for them to do a multiscale vs a standard

    they are using Hipshot hardware, but yeah they are veneers


    At the end there are many factors that up the price, each brand is different, each have their own thing. Up to you to pick the one you feel you like the best features/colors/shape, and the one you are happy to pay the price.
     
  18. diagrammatiks

    diagrammatiks SS.org Regular

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    the goliath is not hipshot hardware.

    HARDWARE
    The bridges are custom made for us to exacting tolerances by our partners at World Music, using a variety of materials proven for longevity and tone. This is the same manufacturer often used by other well known headless manufacturers.

    that doesn't seem like something you'd want to off up on your sales page.
     
  19. A-Branger

    A-Branger SS.org Regular

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    yup, that was the hardware they were going to be using, This was changed after winter NAMM when they meet with Hipshot. If you are on the facebook group you can search it and they have a photo of the bridge, which is ismilar to the vaders minus the flat top part of it that covers the springs. ;) maybe they forgot to update that part of the page
     
  20. KnightBrolaire

    KnightBrolaire 8 string hoarder

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    yup this^. I'm in the ormsby group and I remember the pic. I have multiple vaders and it's pretty easy to see the similarity in the hardware.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     

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