Ohio state fair accident - How safe are pop up fairs?

Discussion in 'Politics & Current Events' started by lewis, Jul 31, 2017.

  1. lewis

    lewis SS.org Regular

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    absolutely shocking to see this accident happen. RIP to anyone who died (I believe just 1 currently with multiple critical conditions?)

    So whilst accidents in massive parks happen, does it beg the question are pop up fairs on fields safe enough?. Logic being at least the actual parks have enough money to ensure the rides are safe. Whereas can we trust these pop up fair ride owners?
    I personally had a near miss on a similar ride years ago when my overhead harness malfunctioned and became way too loose. I literally had to hold on with my arms locked through the ensure I didnt fly out. Vowed to not hit up these sorts of rides ever again.

    Footage here from the Ohio incident!
    ****WARNING... MAY DISTRESS****


     
  2. JSanta

    JSanta SS.org Regular

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    Just as a precaution, I won't go on rides that were literally setup within a few hours - something about that screams UNSAFE to me. That being said, a quick bit of research found 22 deaths since 2010 (in the US) on thrill rides - but if you consider that in 2016 alone in the US there were approximately 40,000 deaths because of motor vehicle crashes, the number on the fair and amusement park rides doesn't look so bad.

    You still won't find me on any of those rides though :)
     
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  3. TedEH

    TedEH Cromulent

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    Realistically, there are a lot more motor vehicles in motion at any given time than these rides (I assume), so that's not a very fair comparison.
     
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  4. DistinguishedPapyrus

    DistinguishedPapyrus SS.org Regular

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    That's literally my worst fear. I've been to fairs plenty of times as a kid and in my college years, but I always picture things like that happening. I purposely look at the structure of the rides, like the hydraulics, motors, bolts, hinges, weld joints... etc. and would picture those things cracking and ripping apart while riding them. The worst thing that happened to me was an overhead harness locked way too far up off my body on this one that is like a big ring, the carriage loops around inside the ring a few times in each direction, taking you upside down through a big loop, maybe 70 feet high. I yelled at the ride operator to try to get his attention right when it started, the dude looked half drunk and/or couldn't hear me over the blaring country music... I held on so tightly that my butt never left the seat anyway. Nothing bad happened, but I never rode it again.

    These ride are slapped together with pins and bolts, broken down and set up in a new location every 10-12 days. I seriously doubt they take time to inspect every single joint, weak points and such every single time the machine is set up. The difference with big permanent parks say like in Disney World, they inspect the rides daily before the park is open, and then once a year the rides are serviced for a week, going over every square inch of the thing, replacing bearings, braking systems, calibrating things. Much safer. Also the fact that it is permanently fixed in a location takes away the need to build it in such a way that it can be taken apart into sections that have to fit on the back of a flat bed truck.

    On the extremely rare occasion that a Disney park has a bad incident occur, considering the millions of people that pass through each year, they are very quick to repair, replace or completely and permanently shut down an attraction and remove it, and such an incident would never happen twice.
     
  5. JSanta

    JSanta SS.org Regular

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    I wasn't trying to make a fair comparison - I was trying to demonstrate that often times our fear of the things that will harm us are not in touch with how dangerous what we do daily is. We choose to ignore the fact we are far more likely to die on the way to the fair than because of a ride at the fair.
     
  6. KnightBrolaire

    KnightBrolaire Sunbro

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    At permanent parks like Six flags or Disney world I'll go on anything and everything, but at fairs I tend to avoid rides in general just due to them not being worth the money and for fear of crap like what happened in ohio.
     
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  7. lewis

    lewis SS.org Regular

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    some slightly scary info here. It seems there are exact versions of this ride in the BIG parks we thought would be safer with their rides. article here about 5 all across the UK that are due to be take out of commission whilst the investigation into this tragedy is undertaken -

    "
    Five rides have been closed at UK theme parks – including Pleasurewood Hills in Suffolk – after a fatal accident in the US.


    The machines are all versions of the KMG Afterburner on which a man was killed and seven people injured at the Ohio state fair.

    Tyler Jarrell, an 18-year-old marine, died after his seat broke off and he was flung 50 feet through the air. His girlfriend Keziah Lewis, 19, who had been sitting next to him, was told of his death while critically ill in hospital.

    Following the accident on Wednesday, July 26, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) carried out a re-inspection of the five machines in the UK, which at Pleasurewood Hills is called the Fireball.

    “There are five machines of this version operating in UK and all have been thoroughly inspected within the last 12 months,” a spokesman added.

    “There is no verified information regarding the immediate cause of the US accident. Following the incident, HSE initiated a re-inspection of these machines. As a result, an Enforcement Notice has been served on the machines, which are now to be taken out of use until the notices have been complied with.

    “HSE will ensure operators are kept abreast of information as it arrives and will take such action as is necessary to ensure the rides are inspected and tested as necessary to ensure safety.”

    The Afterburner has a long swinging arm, which swings up to 120 degrees with a maximum height of 20 metres.

    A description of the ride on Pleasurewood Hills’ website says it is “not for the faint hearted”.

    A spokesman for KMG told the Times: “We are investigating the cause of the accident.

    “Our deepest sympathies go out to all who were involved or affected by this tragic accident.”

    Pleasurewood Hills has been invited to comment.
     

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