Musicians who never learn how to restring/setup their instruments?

Discussion in 'General Music Discussion' started by lewis, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    I once had a guitar made of stained glass. :lol:

    ----

    So, yeah, with domestic stuff, I'm not much of a DIY'er, unless it's a furnace or something electrical, but when I worked as a tech, I would go a little more nuts every time I saw a guitar on the work docket with something like "replace high E string." I always assumed it was some pre-teen kid who just started, and sometimes it was, but usually it wasn't. There were a couple occasions when a gold top Les Paul or a vintage reissue Fender would be sitting there in a case with the E string broken. But really, it is all a matter of having money. This guy who can afford a ~$3k Fender wants me to change his high E string for $15 labour and $1 material. Easy for me. Maybe the guy pays a guy to flush the toilet for him, too, why should I care? I'm sure there are plenty of folks out there who scoff at me for hiring a guy to balance and rotate my tyres. It's one thing I'm sure I could figure out on my own, but I just don't place that kind of value on being equipped to do it myself.
     
  2. wankerness

    wankerness SS.org Regular

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    I responded to "It would take longer to drive your guitar to the shop, wait for it to get done, and pick it up than to do it yourself :2c:". To which I said it doesn't matter, if you just do it as preventative maintenance instead of waiting to do it until right before you need to play.

    If I want to play guitar right now and the guitar needs to be restrung, then yeah, it makes NO sense not to do it right then, myself. But, otherwise, if I'm going to be by the guitar place anyway I'll just drop it off if the strings are getting long in the tooth and pick it up the next time I'm over there. I have more than one guitar! And none of the others have a floyd rose, so I never take any of the others there. I just REALLY hate restringing that floyd rose, especially as the bridge gets old and stops clamping the strings down as easily as it used to. I've had a couple instances of the string suddenly flying out of the saddle right before I have it tuned up all the way. >:O Not to mention the lengthy process of retuning every single string every time another string is tuned.
     
  3. TedEH

    TedEH Cromulent

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    Legit question - are floyds really that hard to deal with it? I've got a zr trem, which is pretty easy to deal with. Is this just a great trem, and floyds are much worse?
     
  4. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    I've had >20 guitars with floating trems, >5 with proper official FR trems...
    There are a couple of extra steps necessary when changing strings. If you don't know what you are doing, you are likely to screw something up and feel like an idiot, but in the youtube age, I see no reason why people can't watch a ten minute tutorial and know exactly how to change strings on a floating trem, especially a Floyd Rose system.
     
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  5. lewis

    lewis SS.org Regular

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    THIS!
     
  6. wankerness

    wankerness SS.org Regular

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    They're frustrating because of how you have to chop the ball off the string and then clamp them into place, versus most other systems where the ball itself is what anchors it into the bridge and there's no possibility at all of it shooting out at some point and having to have the whole process redone (since obviously you can't just stick it back in there without unwinding it completely). On top of that, there's a LOT more tuning adjustment. I have a five string bass with the monorail bridge, and it's darkly funny how little time it takes in comparison (even besides the extra two strings).

    The string popping never used to happen until the bridge started getting old (it's about 20 years old now). I just need to find another 7 string that feels exactly as good to play on.
     
  7. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    Or just thread the string so the ball end is on the opposite side, past the tuners. If the string doesn't have an exposed core, then it saves one extra step.

    It really shouldn't take an extensive amount of time to restring a Floyd. If it does, then you are probably doing some steps out of order or trying to skip steps that ultimately make things much easier.

    Here's what I recommend:

    1. Block the trem. (takes ten seconds)
    2. Loosen the springs. (another 10-20 seconds)
    3. Replace the strings. (5 minutes)
    4. Tune up. (2-3 minutes)
    5. Adjust the springs until the trem unblocks itself. (ten seconds)
    6. Done.

    If you think about changing gauges, you don't even have to reslot nor replace the nut, so, in some cases, it's easier.

    The extra steps really only take about one extra minute, making a nine minute process out of an eight minute process. Is it extra work, sure, but I really don't think it's fair to say that it's that much of an inconvenience.

    I will agree, though, that if you lose one of those tiny cubicle saddle pieces, you are going to have a bad day, so it's not perfect.
     
  8. lewis

    lewis SS.org Regular

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    my biggest issue with floyds is not the restrings. But the tuning. Fine tuners are garbage. They are nowhere near as flexible as just regular tuners are. Then if you have messed up slightly, its real easy to run out of thread on the fine tuner and still be flat or whatever.

    Its a fiddly nuisance. Best of both worlds for me is locking tuners, a graphite nut and a floating tremolo fender style. offers at least 50% of the sounds of a floyd, with all of the pluses that a hard tail offers.
    EDIT: my personal fave being the wilkinson
    [​IMG]
     
  9. Spaced Out Ace

    Spaced Out Ace 0 0 1 0 0 6 5 0 3\

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    I believe a friend of mine had Sperzel locking tuners, and the whammy bar could be abused like Rihanna before the thing went outta tune. The tuners were really "tight" so to speak, which probably had a little to do with why they held tune so damn well. They'd back out easily and smoothly, but tuning up to pitch, like you're supposed to, they were slow and tight. By the way, never back out to get to pitch.

    I'm thinking of getting some Sperzel locking tuners, but I'm not sure if they'd swap with my current tuners without any modification at all. Plus, I'd wanna order with someone else wanting some so we can save about $10 a set on Stew Mac.
     
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