Misha: "just have fun with it"

Discussion in 'General Music Discussion' started by Hollowway, Mar 15, 2018.

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  1. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    I think a part of the change is how music, for me at least, used to be a lot more social. If I heard a cool new band, it was because someone introduced me to them or because they were opening up for another band I liked. Either way, it was a social experience, and I would make sure to pass it on by talking about this new band I heard with my friends and encouraging them to check the band out. In 2018, if I heard a new band, it's because I found them in a google search or they came up on my stream as recommended (by whatever computer algorithm). Not to knock the new way of discovery, but the old organic, more social experience seems to be a lot less prominent, and my friends (maybe because they are just older or because they are sick of hearing music stuff from me) have little interest in checking out the bands I recommend.

    Making a tape for somebody used to be a bonding experience. It's a lot more effort than sending them an IM with a link to youtube, and I think that people used to accept the tape recordings with more eagerness, because it was something you put effort into, whereas an IM'd youtube link is easy to write off.

    Hell, as much as I hated waiting in line to buy advance tickets, one plus was standing next to someone else with similar musical tastes and striking up a conversation with that person about the band for which you are both there to buy tickets. Maybe you'd run into the same person at the actual show.

    Guitar lessons made a big change after the internet gained widespread availability, too. It used to be just you and your instructor, usually one-on-one, at the local mom and pop music store. Now it's signing into whatever website and following the directions. It's probably more effective for learning music the new way, but it will lack the following:

    a) Talking to the other students in the waiting room before/after your lesson (which is how I formed a few of my earliest bands)
    b) Having your instructor recommend songs for you to learn based off of your particular tastes, strengths, and weaknesses.
    c) Getting the chatter from your instructor about peripheral things you need to know, like booking shows or doing sessions or whatever. I found that to be just as valuable as, if not more valuable than, the actual learning to play part.
     
  2. Avedas

    Avedas SS.org Regular

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    I mean that's kind of my point. It's easy to say "go to more shows, buy more merch" within the specific region that is Ontario and the US.
     
  3. chipchappy

    chipchappy SS.org Regular

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    That's true. But I feel like a lot of those bands that do "reunion tours" are bigger ones that know that they have a big enough appeal or draw to net a good chuck of change. Also why the smaller guys are doing "weekend runs" because it doesn't require a full-tour production cost but they can go out and have fun and maybe make a little money too.

    I guess the only point I'm trying to make is that I agree that it's more important than ever to go to shows and support your favorite artist as much as possible, moreso to keep current acts going, rather than to bring back old ones.
     
  4. budda

    budda Guiterrorizer Contributor

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    Except I'm not being region specific and asking everyone to go to more shows :lol:
     
  5. Avedas

    Avedas SS.org Regular

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    Fair enough :agreed:
     
  6. RoRo56

    RoRo56 SS.org Regular

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    I can't agree with this enough. I played in a fairly big local band in Ireland. We played shows all around the country, playing with international touring bands, headlining a couple of festivals. There were so many people who claimed to be huge fans and all they ever did was post about us online. While this was a great help, we lost so much money that the band just gave up in the end. We got 120 really good quality shirts with a design from Josh Middleton and I think we sold about half of them over an 18 month period.
    I think everyone wants local bands to succeed but aren't willing to do anything to actually help them out.
     
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  7. ArtDecade

    ArtDecade Unhindered by Talent

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    Misha's music sucks so hard that it only seems fair that he should have to work a second or third job to get by.

    EDIT: Sorry. I should have probably left that comment in the Unpopular Opinion Thread.
     
  8. lurè

    lurè extended range pizza

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    What bothers me so much is that happens also to fairly big bands.
    Even if I'm not a fan of hardcore or similar I had the opportunity to see for 10€ Terror and Expire at 5 km from where I live.
    My band opened for Brutality Will Prevail and other bands for 5€ per ticket.
    Last May I saw Periphery, The Contortionist and Destrage for 20€.

    People who regularly posts on FB songs of these bands and even have tattoos with their logo didn't show their faces.
     
  9. BusinessMan

    BusinessMan SS.org Regular

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    I keep seeing this article everywhere, but Should this really be any surprise for a metal band these days? Bands say this all the time but a soon as misha from periphery says it everyone loses their minds.
     
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  10. budda

    budda Guiterrorizer Contributor

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    Yes and no. If you go and support bands by attending shows and buying merch, the need to rely on that second and third musical income stream gets reduced dramatically. It's not like streaming is a great revenue stream (some is better than none though) and most bands aren't offering lessons or VIP packages while on tour (you have to be a pretty big deal in your genre to offer VIP lessons).

    If more people paid to see shows (as in, don't ask your friend for guest every time they come through) and bought merch (again, that $10 on a CD or shirt goes a long way) then bands would be better off. I'm not sure how else to state that so that people get it :lol:.

    Something else not mentioned at all so far is first week sales, which determines the next year for bands. If your first week sales (digital and physical) aren't very strong, your chances of getting on good tours with good headliners gets greatly reduced. Conversely if you get decent numbers, then when you apply for tour packages you'll get serious consideration.
     
  11. sakeido

    sakeido Contributor

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    Patreon is the future for bands

    I'd buy more shirts if 99% of them weren't ugly. Gotten pretty picky these days, I used to buy shirts just to support the band, then I did a salvation army run that was 99% band shirts I had never, ever worn because they matched with nothing, were mega tacky, fit like shit, and/or were uncomfortable... and now I don't buy shirts unless I actually like the shirt, and that is a very rare occurrence.

    All the studio endorsement stuff is pretty :lol: to me. Drum samples and plugins? I'll get those from guys like Bob Rock and Forrester Savell, thanks... not some dude who spends most his time playing in a band, not engineering or producing, who spun off some shitty plugin in 2 months of his spare time

    Signature pedals are a sad joke too, but I guess they are bigger money makers than anything to do with the actual writing and performing side of things
     
  12. bulb

    bulb SS.org Regular

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    Maybe so, but this is a situation that extends to bands that actually make good music too, it’s definitely not unique to Periphery.

    Again, not complaining about anything because I have a great life thanks to the music industry.

    My goal is to prepare people who are interested in entering this industry so they know what to expect. This way they can learn to manage their expectations, and hopefully start working on diversifying their income streams from the start!

    This industry is tough enough as is, so you might as well know what you are up against.
     
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  13. MFB

    MFB ExBendable

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    At one point, I had around like, 40 band tees - not specifically from concerts, just in general, and most of them were the most ill-fitting, heavy cotton, destroyed-from-too-many-washes design types and I just said "Fuck it" one day and donated all of them to the Salvation Army; and it was the best feeling in the world when I came to have tees that actually fit like a shirt should and looked good after more than a handful of washes.

    And I know that there's a reason behind it being the more you pay for tees, the bigger gamble with selling all of them to recoup what you spent; but still, at least make the ones in your online stores decent quality.
     
  14. Stilicho

    Stilicho SS.org Regular

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    Yeah I definitely think this will be the case in a few more years.
     
  15. jsmalleus

    jsmalleus SS.org Regular

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    Kids and people in general just don't really have the motivation to go to shows or go out and buy cds, etc. that we had. That's where we went to hear new music and hang out with our friends. If we wanted to play video games together, we packed up cars full of towers and CRT monitors and had LAN parties. Now people can play games together, chat, and hang out with their friends online, they can stream any music they want while commenting and sharing it with each other online. We still go out to shows because that's a part of how we socialize and experience music, but people grow up and other priorities supersede their interest in the music scene. The younger crowd is the demographic that is always going to drive the music industry, and fewer of them have the same motivations we had to actually show up for music.

    It's not all doom and gloom though, I'm hoping autonomous cars might get a few more people out to shows since they'll be able to have a few drinks and let their car take them home rather than arranging and paying for a ride home in a taxi, uber, or cop car. Also hoping crypto music platforms replace the spotify, youtube, etc. models and drastically reduce the amount those companies suck up as middlemen. It looks like more are taking shape and more artists are getting on board (Matt Sorum just introduced one called Artbit within the past week). Maybe kids subscribe to a service where they put on a VR headset and walk around virtual shows as avatars while the likes of us attend in person. I'll continue to buy physical copies, I'll keep going to shows, but we're a dying breed and the industry/artists need to start thinking forward and set up a way to properly monetize based on the social environment rather than drop the ball again.
     
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  16. Drew

    Drew Forum MVP

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    Oh, no, no arguments here - it's not *impossible*, but the numbers being presented for how it's "easy" to make money touring simply don't pass the sniff test, so to speak.
    There are only so many band t-shirts I can (or would even want to) wear. :lol: I mean, I know you're coming from a good place and encouraging people to engage more with their local scene is definitely good advice, but I work 8-5 with a 6am alarm so weekday shows are tough, and I have too many t-shirts as it is. I buy music from bands I like and will try to catch shows on the weekend or the rare week-night show if it's an act I'm really passionate about or a couple friends talk me into it, but there are limits here.

    I think the bigger issue is it didn't used to matter how much money you made (or usually lost) touring, because touring generally translated into CD buys and radio plays and all that other stuff, and THAT's where you made money. These days, streams are basically worthless and sales/downloads are tough, so the number of places you as a musician can actually make money are dwindling.

    Also, Bulb's post in this thread owns. :lol:
     
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  17. budda

    budda Guiterrorizer Contributor

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    Dude I miss nearly every weeknight show because I get up at 5:35am for work and I need my money for me to tour :lol:. I dont like it but its my reality. Thankfully I know a bunch of people who do make it to (and play) those shows.

    Also, you dont have to buy a shirt (but it helps).
     
  18. feraledge

    feraledge Heard the Good News about Maple Fretboards? Contributor

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    Two words: Haunted Shores. Killer metal.

    Am I the only one who already thought Periphery has always been radio friendly?
     
  19. Drew

    Drew Forum MVP

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    I think my bigger point is, if it requires people buying shirts at all the shows to make it economically viable, then something's wrong with the model. Going to a concert should be a simple economic transaction; I buy a ticket, a band plays. It shouldn't have to be an act of charity, and unless you as the band have some other form of revenue, it kind of is.
     
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  20. wankerness

    wankerness SS.org Regular

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    I would take the "crypto" wonkiness out of the post but agree that Youtube and Spotify, etc either have to go or start paying a bucketload to artists if any regular musician's going to make any livable wages in the industry ever again. The internet murdered income for musical artists, and people with this weird sunshiney outlook of "oh, it's fine, you just have to do x, x and x that you didn't have to before!!!" as if that means it's not any worse is crazy-talk.

    Watching my brother have to split time between practicing and writing, trying like hell to find venues to play, having to track down other musicians to play with all the time (he plays jazz), trying to shop around compositions, having to subsidize recordings via crowdfunding, teaching lessons (half of which are ungrateful kiddos), all by himself, is really depressing. I know the sunshine crowd is like "WELL 20 years ago he'd have had a manager who'd have screwed him over!!11," but his pittance of an income would have been the same after the label/manager screwed him over and it would have cut out much of the work he has to do, giving vastly more time for the ability to actually write and practice, aka actually grow as an artist.
     
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