Building over extended period of time?

Discussion in 'Luthiery, Modifications & Customizations' started by JacobShredder, Sep 11, 2017.

  1. JacobShredder

    JacobShredder SS.org Regular

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    Has anyone had any issues building over a significant amount of time? I'm aiming to slowly get my build together and then slowly build. It would probably take the better part of 2 years to get the wood together I want (grad school = perpetually broke) but then when I graduate I should be able to build it relatively (few months). But I'd like to be able to do some simply stuff along the way like gluing the neck blank, and cutting the body to the proper shape.

    Any issues doing it this way? I don't have a humidity controlled room(plus I live in Arkansas..) but I would be buying Kiln dried wood(10% moisture content). Opinions?

    I've built 1 guitar previously but it was 7 years ago in high school but the woods were horrible and it was extremely rushed.

    Proposed wood/construction:
    African Mahogany Body+Flame maple top
    Sapele/Black Walnut/Flame Maple/Black Walnut/Sapele laminated neck
    Gonna try to get my hands on high quality Indian Rosewood if possible.
    Carved top
    Set neck

    Will I run into much trouble if I go ahead and start buying the wood? I figured the Kiln dried woods should be relatively strong/dry enough to not give me too many issues.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2017
  2. LiveOVErdrive

    LiveOVErdrive SS.org Regular

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    In my opinion (from more of a life point of view), you are better off just waiting until you'll be able to work on it for real. Otherwise you are spending money and taking up space with wood that you won't really use for another two years. Once you're ready to get moving, it doesn't take that long to assemble the materials and glue and cut.

    To me, It sounds like you're doing what I do often: get really excited about something you want to do and try to do a "soft start" to scratch that itch for now. The way this usually ends up going (for me) is by the time I would be ready to dive in full time, I've moved onto something else and the stuff I bought just sits there. However, you aren't me, so ymmv.

    As to your actual question about the wood: I don't worry about storing wood, but I do have air conditioning for the summer, so that keeps things a little more neutral.

    Sorry to be a downer. I don't mean to be discouraging.
     
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  3. MikeNeal

    MikeNeal SS.org Regular

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    Buy the wood whenever. The longer you have it the better it gets. By dont start any machining until you are ready to work
     
  4. Walshy

    Walshy SS.org Regular

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    Extended-period builds have a big plus in that you can deal with wood movement between stages before critical glueing takes place. Too long though and you could lose interest as your vision changes over time. Work to solid plans throughout to avoid that temptation.

    Take the time to learn as much as you can from the internet luthiery community and patiently gain experience with the tools required and you should be able to build a great guitar if you work carefully. Bear in mind though that it is rare to nail it on your first attempt; expect mistakes and to learn from them. This is why I would recommend a fairly plain first build; solidbody, no fancy droptop, one-piece set neck, no binding, dot inlays if any etc. That is usually enough for many to get the bug. Then increase your difficulty progressively.
     
  5. JacobShredder

    JacobShredder SS.org Regular

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    My first build was poplar body, top routed strat style, bolt on, dot inlay. Turned out okay, but finish job was my first ever and I did a terrible job. Wood work was decent and I have since done different woodworking jobs. I'm gonna use scrap wood to try techniques on before doing it on the real wood.
     
  6. DistinguishedPapyrus

    DistinguishedPapyrus SS.org Regular

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    If it makes you feel any better I still have a bass that's not yet finished that I've been siting on for about 21 months. It'll probably be another 8-9 months before I actually finish it. It's nearly done, but it just got put aside after I stopped playing bass as much and got back into guitar builds.

    Over all it's a nice build, I'm pretty happy with it, I had no major design changes throughout the build and seems to have no ill effects of being in-progress this whole time.
     
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  7. warped

    warped SS.org Regular

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    Will be no prob. My first build took me over 2 yrs (which I still haven't posted any pics of yet). Take your time
     

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