Best first Jazzmaster?

Discussion in 'Beginners/FAQ' started by Masoo2, Feb 5, 2018.

  1. Masoo2

    Masoo2 SS.org Regular

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    Wanting something that's not an 8 string with dual humbuckers and a hardtail.

    Been in a rut, started listening to post hardcore/math rock/indie/pop/dreampop, jazzmaster would better fit those sounds.

    I'm torn between the Vintage Modified, J Mascis Sig, or shelling out the dough for a 60's Lacquer.

    I'd really rather not drop $800-$1000 on a guitar that potentially could become a novelty to me (or I'll love it and embrace the offset), but people seem to invest hundreds in upgrades for the Squiers. Mastery/Staytrem Bridges, AMVI tremolos, new electronics, good quality SD/Novak/Lollar pickups, etc. so I'm afraid the cost would come out to that of a 60's Lacquer.

    The J Mascis has some pretty unique features that make it standout compared to other Jazzmasters, including a thinner(?) neck with a satin finish, (basically) P90 pickups, and a short distance between the trem and bridge. However, that also takes away from the traditional Jazzmaster sound which is something I'd like to experience.

    So, what do you guys think? Are upgrades for Squiers necessary? Is the J Mascis sig too different to be considered a *true* Jazzmaster? Is the quality/stability difference between the Squiers and MIMs worth it considering the great rep higher end Squiers have?
     
  2. KnightBrolaire

    KnightBrolaire git gud scrub

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    If you've never played a jazzmaster, you'll probably like the shape. It's very comfortable. Personally i'd say go to a guitar shop and try some jazzmasters out. I like the squier affinity hh jazzmaster and jim root models personally, but the j.mascis was nice too.
     
  3. wiretap

    wiretap n00b

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    I have a ‘60s Lacquer that I put a buzzstop on to change the break angle over the bridge to more a TOM-type setup. It’s just a bar that screws into the trem plate so you can always go back to the “traditional” jazzmaster sound. That said, I dig the guitar, I’m a big fan of the higher-end MIM’s. They’re killer guitars and not far off from their American counterparts, honestly. I’ve done other mods to it but not because I disliked what was in it originally. Just personal preference. You won’t get a humbucker sound from the AV65’s in the Classic 60’s. They are 100% vintage JM-style pickups. I changed the bridge of mine to a custom-made Seymour Duncan that’s a humbucker-type JM pup wound to the specs of a Custom Custom. Think of like a hot rail type pickup for single coils, but for a jazzmaster. Left the neck pickup though and the sounds I can get are versatile as hell. Super rad and currently one of my favorite guitars I own.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2018
  4. Masoo2

    Masoo2 SS.org Regular

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    The Jim Root one looks sick but I'm honestly not looking for another hardtail HH guitar haha. All of the Jim Root sigs are nice though. The offset shape looks really comfortable so I'm excited to finally try one out soon.

    So the buzzstop would effectively give the same effect as the shorter bridge/trem distance of the J Mascis? That's one of the many pros I've heard to getting it over a normal Jazzmaster. Would it just be easier to get something like a Mastery bridge, or is the buzz still not affected by a bridge swap?

    Good to hear that the Lacquer's pickups are true to the Jazzmaster sound. Will I enjoy the sounds of them? I don't know, but I definitely want to find out.

    What are your thoughts on the neck? Anything more metal oriented you could compare it to in terms of feel or shape?
     
  5. HeHasTheJazzHands

    HeHasTheJazzHands greg rulz ok

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    G&L is going to be doing a tribute version of their Doheny, which is basically a JM with a better trem.

    [​IMG]
     
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  6. wiretap

    wiretap n00b

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    Yes, the buzzstop does exactly the same thing as the J Mascis bridge set up. Gets rid of the ringing that is typical of a jazzmaster and increases the pressure of the strings on the bridge to prevent it from rocking like they do. The mastery bridges are super nice but also ridiculously expensive. Buzz Stop’s are like 30 bucks if you buy the brand’s. Or do what I did and get a Chinese-made one on ebay for $10 shipped. Here’s a photo with it, it’s literally just a piece of metal that you pass the strings through.

    [​IMG]

    The neck on this model is more of a modern C-shape, not super thin but not what I would call thick. I play mostly ESP’s and it’s not THAT bigger than the thin U’s on all my ESP’s. The radius is the biggest difference. Most metal guitars have the modern flat radius, this is a vintage radius so way more rounded. Some people may hate that. I adapt to different necks easily as I like lots of both modern and vintage guitars so it’s not a big deal to me.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2018
  7. goose_78

    goose_78 SS.org Regular

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    I had a Mascis for awhile, and they’re great guitars, even left stock. The p90s in them have a little more Umph then your standard JM pickups. The neck was great too with nice big frets. They’re pretty killer for what you pay, even brand new.
     
  8. Masoo2

    Masoo2 SS.org Regular

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    Yeah, the Mastery Bridges are a bit pricey. The StayTrem bridge seems like a good cheaper alternative.

    Modern C is great to hear. For some reason I was under the impression Jazzmasters had huge necks?

    Did the pickups still have that signature Jazzmaster chime to them? Or were they just like P90s? (Which I've still never tried so I'm not necessarily opposed to them)
     
  9. Philip N

    Philip N SS.org Regular

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    I used to have a J Mascis Jazzmaster and it was a monster of a guitar. Build quality was top notch and the sounds were killer, too. From sparkly clean to full on P90 growl. Sucks I had to let it go, but I just couldn't jive with the trem..
     
  10. stinkoman

    stinkoman SS.org Regular

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    One important thing that hasn't been mentioned with the laquer and some other jazzmasters like the is the 7.25 radius. That to a lot of people is big turn off. To me its part of the jazzmaster experience but I am also a surf guy and played lots of jazzmasters. The cheaper ones like the mascis squier don't capture the jazzmaster sound and vibe, despite it is actually really nice guitar. The cheaper ones have the wrong bridge and trem placement, wrong pickups,body wood(if that matters) but you mentioned all that.

    I'd look for a used troy van leeuween personally. It has all the correct specs, with a better bridge. They are more expensive new than the 60s but can be had cheaper because they are more abundant. Guitar center used website has had them between $700-800 multiple times when i was looking to buy one. A a cheaper option is a used squire vintage modified with parts switched out that pop up reverb from time to time might be an option to look at. it will also have a more modern neck shape and radius if the 7.25 is an issue.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2018
  11. budda

    budda Guiterrorizer Contributor

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    Have you sat down with one yet?

    A vintage modified or classic vibe squier will do it, assuming they make jazzmasters in those lines.

    Tele's are very popular for those styles too.
     
  12. lewis

    lewis SS.org Regular

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    get the Baritone jazzmaster
     
  13. wiretap

    wiretap n00b

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    I did touch on the radius, it is for sure the main difference particularly with the lacquer model as the neck on that isn’t super chunky and most people could adapt to it if they haven’t only just played flat Ibanez type shred necks, I feel like. The radius took some getting used to with my JM and Tele. I didn’t quote it on here but I’ve heard nothing but good things about the TVL’s, also. Probably a better recommendation than the lacquer for someone not wanting to put in too much effort.
     
  14. JSanta

    JSanta SS.org Regular

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  15. Masoo2

    Masoo2 SS.org Regular

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    Finally got to sit down with one, more specifically a Squier Deluxe

    Didn't mind it one bit, but I definitely noticed some of the issues people always bring up with Jazzmasters. Buzzing at the bridge, mediocre trem on lower end models, etc...

    Neck was a bit chunky but in a nice way, still want to try out the VM and 60's though for a more traditional style guitar.
     
  16. silverabyss

    silverabyss

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    No way :eek: thats awesome news
     

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